I want to explain something

I’m contacted by many who have been at the game/sport of darts for a long time and are not happy with how well they play. They wish to rise to the next level, what ever they view as the next level to be for themselves. In fact, the dart game/sport is mostly populated by people who do not believe reading about darts is required. My guess is that 95% of those who have darts as part of their lives do not take it seriously enough to consider studying as part of the game. I do not mean study in the sense of formal education courses, far from it, after all I’m talking about a pass time game here. At least that is the case for many who have darts as part of their lives. There is nothing wrong with this mind set until and unless the person begins to think about getting better at it. When they begin to think about becoming a competitor, a dart shooter, is when they run into problems.

 

Flight School has been constructed to help dart nuts get the kinks out of their game and some of the kinks are above the shoulders. As many have pointed out, and wonder about, mind set and attitude has a lot to do with how well a person plays this game so those things are important for someone who wishes to perfect their game beyond being a league player.

Many miss the point of practice. They think spending a lot of time in front of a dart board will make them better at the game. This is true, to an extent, but as I point out in my book, with the results of a psychological study to support my view, once a person gets past the neophyte stage it gets more involved and the specific type of “practice” becomes very important. No less enjoyable, but critical to improvement. Missing this development element is what allows so many to stagnate at a certain level of play which no amount of dedication seems to help. They never get any better.

 

Some become impressed with how much they’ve improved, so fast, without doing anything but playing a lot and this is what leads to stagnation at a certain level. They play well enough to win against most players and even some shooters and so become complacent about not needing to learn any more about practice, or how to practice. They just believe they need to do more of it.

With FS I try to instill a mind set about practice and short cutting to just a couple of drills seems to by pass that, which means an important part of FS is missed, so it is less likely to provide full effect.

FS is not just a couple of “games” to play. It is a whole progress program which helps with mind set and preparation for stiffer competition. As I say, repeatedly, there are no short cuts, no easy ways, and no silver bullets to perfecting the way you do it.

 

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