Category Archives: Flight School

A conversation about old dogs and new tricks

Improving your game after years of playing.

 

From: George [mailto:challengegeo@comcast.net]
Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2010 5:35 AM
To: Gary Subject: Thanks for asking about FS
 

Thank you for your interest in Flight School. Please read the attached.

 

—– Original Message —–

From: Gary  

To: ‘George’

Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2010, 3:18 PM Subject: RE: Thanks for asking about FS

Hi George;

Thanks for your prompt reply. I have purchased, but not yet received, Darts: Beginning to End. Are the practice drills mentioned in your e-mail attachment set out in the book?

I have been playing for over 20 years in leagues and tournaments. I am interested in learning how to improve my competition performance, particularly in tournaments against top level players.

Thanks, Gary

 

From: George [mailto:challengegeo@comcast.net]
Sent:
Saturday, September 11, 2010 5:02 PM

To: Gary Subject: Re: Thanks for asking about FS

Hi Gary, yes there is a chapter “DIY Flight School” and the drills and techniques are all there also, along with a whole bunch of other stuff I hope you find of interest. I’m around too; if you have specific somethings you think I may be able to help with.

I’ll wait until you get to go through B2E (my nickname) to see if you come up with anything.

And thank you for your interest in B2E, George S.

 

—– Original Message —–

From: Gary  

To: ‘George’

Sent: Thursday, September 16, 2010 6:43 PM Subject: RE: Thanks for asking about FS

 

Hi George; 

I received B2E today and began with the accuracy drill. I believe this will be very helpful to me and I thank you for your book and advice. I started out with 6 numbers and finished in 15 minuets. Therefore I will begin adding numbers as you suggest, aiming toward your standard of 14 numbers in 40 minuets.

 

Prior to B2E I used other practice methods I still find useful. I particularly like going around the clock on doubles, double down (sometimes called half-it and a variety of other names) and “29” developed by Bob Anderson (according to John Lowe). In your opinion is it harmful for me to use these other methods along with accuracy or should I keep at accuracy until I progress to the 10 ton drill? 

Thanks, Gary

 

From: George [mailto:challengegeo@comcast.net]
Sent:
Friday, September 17, 2010 6:57 AM

To: Gary Subject: Re: Thanks for asking about FS

 

I wouldn’t say your practice methods are ‘harmful’ but instead, un-necessary. In Chapter six of B2E I talk about distractions and competing with your self, and have Flight Schoolers comments on these things. I think this is really important as you will see.

Chapters five and six are meant to head off mistakes I’ve seen so many make and improve a person’s prowess at the game.

The tendency of many, if not most dart players is to jump right in and start practicing. Diving into chapter seven stuff is what quite a few do. That can lead to missing the prowess growth knowledge and understanding stuff which is beyond the physical act of shooting a dart. The chapters other than seven are where all that ‘stuff’ is written.

Let me know what you discover and what else I may help with.

George S.

 

—– Original Message —–

From: Gary

To: ‘George’

Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 2010 2:00 PM

Subject: RE: Thanks for asking about FS

George,

I have now read ch. 1-9 of B2E and am practicing the grouping and accuracy drills. I find both helpful and am trying my best to adjust to the new practice routine. The most difficult challenges I am facing relate to competing with my self and focus/concentration. Sometimes during the accuracy drill I find my mind drifting to distractions involving the mechanics of my stance, grip and stoke instead of simply spot shooting and feeling my stroke.

Also I occasionally want to check my progress by playing 501 several times and checking my PPD average, playing SEWA practice games, etc.  When I do this it is difficult to resist trying to beat my personal best. I guess improvement in these areas will come with time.

Part of my challenge is associated with the fact I have been playing competitively for over 20 years and am already one of the better players in my 3 county area (e.g. I have represented my league in regional ADO 501 & Cricket events, won league titles and MVPs, local stuff like that).  I have been working on my grip, stance and stroke for many years in a continuing effort to improve. However, I know, from competing at tournaments against top level players and then watching those players advance to the later rounds of the tournament, that I am far from “good”. Accordingly I will keep at the drills suggested in B2E and see if I can make a break through to the next level.

Thanks again, Gary

 

From: George [mailto:challengegeo@comcast.net]
Sent:
Wednesday, September 22, 2010 2:02 PM

To: Gary Subject: Re: Thanks for asking about FS

Hi Gary, I know this is a new twist to the kind of practice most people are used to but in its simplicity lays its effectiveness.

A1 and A2 will smooth out your stroke and spot shooting will become a natural part of your focus of concentration as you continue to use them.

You may find that A4 is no longer necessary except as a warm up exercise before beginning A2. When you’re at A2 your darts will group as part of that practice regimen.

As you become used to not testing your self against your self and begin simply sticking a dart in a target you will gain an absolute knowledge that you will stick ‘this dart into that target’ or come bloody close, simply because you’ve done it so repetitively.

This phase of practice is quietly letting you know that shooting every dart the same is something you do and when you take this practice knowledge into competition (the third phase of practice) you will experience the results. 

I find no difficulty with playing a few games of 501 or SEWA practice games now and then since you understand what competing with your self is and how detrimental it is to your improvement. 

Also, recognizing how your stroke and dart delivery feels is not a bad thing, so long as you don’t dwell on it, since I believe that will be how you will ‘get it back’ when you go a bit off and that will get you through to the next round in competition.

Welcome to Flight School Gary, I know the next level is well within your reach. Please keep me in the loop; I’d like to be the first person to recognize there is a rising star on the PDC scene.

Your friend in darts, George S.

 

 

—– Original Message —–

From: Gary

To: ‘George’

Sent: Monday, September 27, 2010 1:29 PM

Subject: RE: Thanks for asking about FS

Hi George; 

I am continuing to follow the accuracy drill with success. I am doing 12 numbers (all doubles and triples as instructed) in about 35 to 40 minuets. I plan on continuing this practice routine, increasing to 14 or 15 numbers as I progress. 

In the foreseeable future I may move on to the ten ton drill. When I am ready do you recommend adding the ten ton drill to my accuracy routine, replacing accuracy with ten ton, or alternating these drills on different days? Considering the fact I do not have unlimited time to devote to practice, should I simply stick with accuracy for now and leave the ten ton drill alone? 

One of the constraints I face is the amount of time I can devote to practice. I read the section in B2E regarding sacrifice. I understand that the level of proficiency I achieve is directly related to the amount of practice I put in. I also recognize that there is a balance to be achieved between darts and the other things I want to do and have to do. With that in mind, I appreciate accuracy because I can predict the amount of time I will need to devote to practice and then allocate the time in my day. With the ten ton drill the amount of time needed to complete the drill is somewhat unpredictable (I tried the drill using only one number to get a feel for it).  

Thanks for your assistance, Gary

 

From: George [mailto:challengegeo@comcast.net]
Sent:
Monday, September 27, 2010 1:43 PM

To: Gary Subject: Re: Thanks for asking about FS

Great news, Gary, your progress with A2. I think A2 can forever be part of your practice since once you have your stroke perfected it will allow you to keep it sharp.

 A3, as you already found out, is a different animal. You can use this to raise your level of competence you have with your perfected stroke while you continue to keep it sharp with A2. You can still control the amount of time you spend at darts only now you’ll do it with how many numbers you set up. You’ll learn how long one number will take and will be able to work from there. A practice regimen that has the amount of A2 and A3 which you can finish within your available time should work out just fine.

Keep my in the loop please.

Your friend in darts, George S.

 

—– Original Message —–

From: Gary

To: ‘George’

Sent: Wednesday, October 06, 2010 8:31 PM

Subject: RE: Thanks for asking about FS

 

Hi George;

Thanks again for flight school. I am now consistently doing 14 numbers on A2 (all double, triples and bull) in 30 to 35 minuets. I am really starting to feel improvement in my ability to hit a desired double or triple on demand. In fact, I expect to hit the required target as needed. I have been seeing improvement during league play, especially on out shots. Soon I will start incorporating A3 at some level into my practice routine.

What is your opinion of a champion’s choice board (1/2 wide doubles and triples) as a practice tool? Gary

 

From: George [mailto:challengegeo@comcast.net]
Sent:
Thursday, October 07, 2010 5:40 AM

To: Gary
Subject: Re: Thanks for asking about FS

I am not a fan of spending money which doesn’t need to be spent and that is how I feel about “practice” dart boards. If you are using the ‘spot shooting’ technique your target is already as small as you can make it. I don’t see an advantage to a smaller double/triple bed since the hole is the same size. Some believe it helps them see a larger target when they switch from the “practice” board to regulation but I’m of the opinion you should practice the way you’ll play.

Thanks for the update. Congratulations on your progress. I’m particularly pleased that you are enjoying competition more as a result of your practice work. Some struggle a bit taking practice habits into competition (emotional practice).

George S.

 

—– Original Message —–

From: Gary

To: ‘George’

Sent: Monday, October 18, 2010 7:41 PM Subject: RE: Thanks for asking about FS

 

Hi George;

Well, I am still enjoying flight school and continue to progress with A2. I typically complete 15 numbers in 27 to 35 minuets.  I believe the most difficult challenge in achieving my goal is emotional practice. I live in a somewhat rural area and seldom get to play against good ADO tournament level competition.

In my prior communication to you I stated I have realized improvement during league play. However, although I am improving and winning, I notice that nerves during competition sometimes cause me not to play as well as I practice, particularly when my opponent is skilled and/or the stakes are high. It is more difficult for me to “put the dart in the hole” under such circumstances despite being able to do so in practice. Of course, I am aware this phenomenon is common. My opponents also have the same difficulty. And I have observed “wobbly knees syndrome” in some world class level players, especially when they play on stage against the likes of Phil Taylor, James Wade or Raymond Van Barneveld.

In your opinion, is consistent solitary practice the best way to improve at the emotional aspect of competition?

Thanks, Gary

 

From: George [mailto:challengegeo@comcast.net]
Sent:
Thursday, October 19, 2010 5:40 AM

To: Gary
Subject: Re: Thanks for asking about FS

Your control of your stroke is a very good thing, and I believe it comes from your work with A2. 

In response to your question “is consistent solitary practice the best way to improve at the emotional aspect of competition?”: You seem to have achieved the goal for A2: perfecting control of the flight path of your dart; so now A2 becomes a tool for maintaining your edge and you should be ready for A3.

The prerequisite for A3 is a perfected stroke and the goal of A3 is confidence in your ability to use your perfected stroke under pressure. I suggest you stay with A2 as you ease into A3. This is the best path to overcoming “wobbly knees syndrome” and being able to “put the dart in the hole” against the toughest competitors you can find.

As for shooting pressure darts, “I notice that nerves during competition sometimes cause me not to play as well as I practice, particularly when my opponent is skilled and/or the stakes are high.” What do you think causes you to miss: (1) is it because you are over excited? Or (2) is it because you are afraid of choking?

If it is due to (1): Being excited is why we play the game, isn’t it? Enjoy the tingling, the rush! I hope you never lose it! If it is (2): It would seem that you have a confidence problem. If that is the case, A3 along with A2, should let you work on fixing that. Take your practice attitude with you to the oche and shoot the shot just as you do every practice session. Your A2 and A3 practice will pull you through.

From “Beginning to End” of Flight School you are learning confidence in yourself in all aspects of the game. You gain confidence that you can score heavily and hit any out as well. Flight School will not take away from knowing you have a pressure shot to make but your work with it will give you the knowledge that you can hit that out, or triple, at any given time, taking away any fear you may have.

The more you play against better competition the more confidence you will gain in these pressure shots. Competition is practice for competition.

Your cheer leader and fan, George S.

 

 

Becoming a ‘Shooter’; a girl’s experience so far.

Hey George!

 

 Flight School has worked wonders for me, and I recommend it to everyone I know! Not only am I consistent with my groupings but my accuracy has gone through the roof!  When I practice with both trainings the next week of matches I am extremely on and do so well. So far this season (in league only – I play on a team in a lower division of C) I have a 9M (20-18-17), over 20 crunches and tons each! I also have quite a few tons in at 301. I am currently the top female player in my division but overall as well. (I do go back and forth with another guy for best player but I have been personally told by him and his entire team that I have a better shot).  Outside of league, I am able to compete with people at the top level (Tungsten), and keep up with them. On most days even beating them in matches. This does get to them but I think it is primarily because I am a girl, and once they say girls can’t play darts I tend to prove them extremely wrong and apologizing by the end of the match. No Mercy right??

 

I feel as though I am fortunate, as I am so comfortable with my shot, my stance and the board. No longer do these things intimidate me and I have been able to go to the line, drop everything behind me and focus on the game ahead. Most times though, I do have help from my ipod (in one ear) as it keeps everything out of my head, however, I am able to play just as well without it and once I hit the line its just me and the board. A few weeks ago there was even a fight and I had missed the whole thing as I was the only one shooting and not paying attention!

 

There is still tons of room for improvement, but for me right now I am getting where I want to be. It is extremely hard playing in a lower division where you lack competition but I do my best to never lower my game and I am learning how to do that each time. Over all it has put me ahead.

 

Everyone falls off the wagon, and there are times where I can’t find the time to practice, even when I make time, it seems like something comes up. I can tell those weeks by my stats during league. I still shoot very well, don’t get me wrong, but you can tell my accuracy with the triples suffers during those weeks

My biggest struggle is, and I feel always will be, my outs. I am not sure what it is about it, but for me it is such a struggle. I have tried memorizing them and picking random outs and shooting down, but I can not for the life of me be told a number and then magically know the out. I always have to go shot by shot, which at times does mess with my concentration. Good thing I am pretty good at doubles because I know there were a few close games because I have had to take my time with my outs.

 

I am still a girl in progress and for me it is not being on the cover of magazines or winning the top award in the country, its about playing a game I love and having fun; and that’s what I do. Without flight school I don’t think I would still be playing and I wouldn’t have the respect for the game I do now. I have played top people (Popp) and I have been told I will be one to watch out for, but that’s not it for me. It’s about knowing my game and the board and doing what I love.

 

Thank you again for all that you do to help darters better their game and themselves. I am so lucky I had such a good person pass this along to me. Actually writing this makes me want to do accuracy training right now!

 

Thanks again George and I hope one day our travel paths cross and I am able to meet you! You are such a great person who has taught me nothing but respect for myself and the game that I love and will always continue to love!

 

Thanks George!!!!

Sarah Mills

 

A conversation with David Haines

From: David Haines

To: ‘George Silberzahn’

Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 11:43 AM

 

“Sorry, a couple of minor notes that will (possibly) be helpful in fixing me. J

 

When I’m on I feel that I have good follow through, when I’m off, I don’t.

When I’m off I miss low and lunge.

When I’m on, I am conscious of keeping my elbow up through the throw.”

 

From: George Silberzahn  
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 2:32 PM

On the 8th I sent you a message with attachments. I’m re-sending that Part 1 now, with the attachments.

 

From: George Silberzahn
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 7:28 PM
When you read Session 1 you will get my general belief as far as multiple sets of darts is concerned, and I’ll take a shot at what you’ve told me below.

 

Here’s what I hear you saying in your message of June 12, 11:43 AM and your response to Part 1: you are trying to compensate for inconsistency. Instead of concentrating on where you want to put a dart you might be spending too much energy thinking about how you are delivering the dart.  You may already be able to “feel” your stroke; and “know” your stroke. If so, you should be able to get it in line. I think you already have the dedication since you know you: have good follow through, miss low and lunge, am conscious of keeping my elbow up!”

 

I think it’s a discipline thing. When you are off there are two choices as I see it: accept it’s going to be a bad night or get your stroke back in line. 

I suspect your inconsistency can be fixed with the right practice routines, which I believe is “Group Darts” and “Accuracy.” Once you get into the “Accuracy” routine you will find that in order to complete a session you will have to correct what ever flaw you’re struggling with or you will be in front of the dart board when the funeral director comes for you. Over time this will diminish the periods when you are “off” by perfecting your stroke so it’s as natural as breathing.

It only took you nine months to learn how to breath in the beginning of you, but of course you didn’t have your concentration interrupted very much during that time.

“After 4 years of shooting with ‘magic’ darts, (literally bought them off a guy I was playing because from the first time I threw them I was noticeably better than I had been before) I decided, somehow, that I needed an equipment change. 5 sets later, I’m changing all over the place.

Two weeks ago I had Jeff Pickup make me a set that are the same basic shape (pencil) and weight (roughly 23.5) as my old darts, but DEAD smooth and with a small notch where my finger and thumb go toward the back of the dart.  These may end up just being my practice darts – here’s what I like about them – If I do not cock my wrist on the throw, I cannot hit the board with them. As long as my form is on, they are on the money – no compromises”.

It’s like I said above: another nine months may be called for. But pick the dart that you’re taking with you and stick with it. That thought: “I wonder if I’d be playing better if I had that other set of darts” will kill you! Get rid of it, it’s a distraction of the biggest kind.

“Conversely, I can throw my 25 g John Parts and always be close, but never feel like I’m having the highs and lows I get with these.

I leave myself in your hands, sorry for going on.”

As I wrote in Session 1, and everywhere else, a dart combination is just an object and it does not change. Once you have a combination which allows the dart to stick straight out of the dart board you are done experimenting with darts and combinations except in very rare situations like life changing events, this includes the march of time, or you just want new darts. Baring those exceptions it is time to either accept your inconsistency, or do something about it. So the things you are describing may not be dart related, they may be David related. When you pick up a new set of darts you center your focus on all the right things as you “test drive” the darts, but as you get used to them you revert to your old self, with an inconsistent stroke.

I hope I’m not being too harsh. Your friend in darts, George S

 

From: David Haines

To: ‘George Silberzahn’

Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 4:59 PM

Thanks George,

No, you’re not being too harsh, I can handle it.

Let me know what I have to do next…

David

 

From: David Haines

To: ‘George Silberzahn’

Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2007 9:23 AM

 

Thanks George,

Yes, I’ve read through those sections and they are both helpful and reinforcing.  

David

 

From: George Silberzahn

Sent: June-13-07 8:42 PM
Hey, it’s me again. This time with some drills.

 

From: David Haines

To: ‘George Silberzahn’

Sent: 2009

George, Hi.

It’s me, David Haines again.  I attached our previous conversation, from like 2 years ago, for reference.

 

The purpose of this note is just to thank you for all your help. I’ve implemented many of your recommendations regarding release and stroke, got off my issues (for the most part) with equipment experimentation and knuckled down with a slightly modified version of the Accuracy drill at the centre of my dart training.

 

While I hadn’t had as much time as I would have liked to practice over the past year, I did continue to work on things, with a special focus on “spot shooting” and accuracy, as well as a determined effort of self-analysis when it comes to winning, losing, and handling pressure.

 

While my progress was gradual for much of this time, with the usual fits and starts that can be expected, I did achieve a very real breakthrough a couple of months ago, and this has been massively evident in my play, my confidence, my ability to perform under pressure, and my league and tournament results.

 

I’ve gone from being a good A player to being somewhat more than that. Certainly not a Provincial threat at this point, but good enough to knock off seriously talented players in short format games.  In long format matches, players who would consistently win 70 percent or more against me are often left packing their darts and wondering what the heck happened.

 

In tournament play, I am finding myself reasonably relaxed, as opposed to a bundle of nerves. This is because I KNOW I can hit that target if I just focus on it.  When I get my mechanics out of my head, look at the target and just let fly, the results are there, more or less.

 

At this point I’ve been invited into super level leagues and higher level local tournaments. This is a real achievement for me and is opening the door for further improvement. I would not have been a candidate for this a few years ago.  The challenge now will be upping my practice level, and my game, without getting stale or discouraged.

 

I don’t say these things to brag, George, just to say “thanks.”

 

Hey, I know I was the one who did the work, but you provided me with some excellent direction, and I appreciate it.

Thanks again, David

 

From: David Haines 
Sent:
To: ‘George Silberzahn’

July-09-2010 9:14 AM

For an update,

My game is continuing to progress. I continue to use the accuracy drill(A2) and the 10 ton drill(A3), and it has helped my concentration and game ability. My results in practice and in competitive situations continue to improve as I’ve moved past being self conscious and overly analytical at the line into really believing that I’m going to hit the target, then going ahead and hitting it.

 

Now that I don’t compete with myself, my ppd’s and winning percentages continue to improve because my practice is pretty much ALWAYS productive.  My concentration on doubles in the accuracy drill is paying massive dividends in match play, and I look forward to seeing how far FS and my own work can take me.

Thanks again, David

Score Boards for A2

Inventive people have found ways to register A2 hits using creative methods.

 

A2 (Accuracy) with a Dart Master III as the score board: Eric Matkowski

First select the Cricket option for which game to play.

Then use the Cricket numbers on the Dart Master III to track target number hits. Taping a strip of paper on the DMIII with a list of the actual target numbers is helpful.

Using three hits as the number of hits required to close a target number you can have up to 14 target numbers in your routine and double up numbers if you wish (like T20). You may use both the player-one side and the player-two side of each number.

Example: Using my beginning suggested target number list: 60, 57, 40, 20, 54, 32, 16, bull

Use the DMIII player one 20 for 60; use the DMIII player one 19 for 57; use the DMIII player one 18 for 40; use the DMIII player one 17 for 20; use the DMIII player one 16 for 54; use the DMIII player one 15 for 32; use the DMIII player two 20 for 16.     For the Bull, use both player one and player two sides of the Target Master III Bull to prevent it from ending the game when it sees all numbers closed.

 

Using a laptop with Excel Bob Given created a work sheet for tracking target number hits. Available by request through challengegeo@comcast.net

Alex on FS effect

“You sent me the first package of flight school last week. It included accuracy 1. There were two parts to it. I walked through that first part with no problem. The second part was much harder but with much practice I got that down pretty good too.

What an amazing drill. My stroke took on a mind of its own, and it is no longer what I remember of it. It is much smoother, more repeatable, and just easier to do. While I haven’t officially “beaten” the drill I believe that it has served its purpose. I will continue to practice it to tighten it up, but I think I’m ready for the next drill. You can be the judge though. Let me know what you think.”
ALEX

Dayjob Dave

I can’t tell you what a revelation this was. I was in danger of falling into despair and change for change’s sake (I’m the guy who, a few years ago in a hunt to slightly improve my results with darts I’d used for 5 years, went through 14 sets in 14 months! A situation that was NOT helped by hitting a max with all of them. YES, I ended up back on the same set I began with.)

I already changed my throwing style this year to be a more natural ‘wrist thrust’ style and it’s fine. A bad day nearly sent me flying into oblivion. Without the guidance of FS and George, it would have. The people who edged me out probably think it did.

I could have been looking back next fall wondering what happened, struggling to regain my form. Instead, I have my routine for the summer, and I’ll avenge myself on opening day in September.

Funny thing is, the strong players who were getting me (and deservedly so) weren’t gloating. They have this t-shirt already, and they knew I was bending wires today and it could be them tomorrow.

Back to the practice board and my modified Accuracy drill. I’ve got a practice routine based around the doubles, around grouping and around perfecting scoring that’s working. If I spend the time on the board I’d have spent looking for new equipment and new ways to throw, I’ll be right where I need to be.

Thanks again.

It Works!!!

I talked to my captain early before our match on Thurs.  His response was “ok, you get the max tonight and we’ll see what you can do” I shot 3rd in the Oh-1 lineups and ended up doubling in 3 of the 4 Oh-1 games I shot in.  I also took out 3 of the 4.  My cricket game was amazing as well.  I was completely in the zone.  They shot first, hit 2 20’s.  I shot next, hit 6 20’s!!!!!  They shot, I forgot what they hit.  My partner shot gets 1 19.  When it was my turn again, I hit a double 19, trip 18 and trip 17!!!!!!  This is NOT my norm.  I was way HOT.  That being said I contribute a lot of it to being mentally prepared to rise to a challenge as well as the practice I have been putting in.  I owe a lot to you and your books in my young career.   I have competed on a national level in volleyball.  I am also a certified bowling coach and carry an avg. generally around the 195 mark. 

 

The only reason I mention these things is because I always try to broaden my knowledge from books in sports that I have really achieved in, but have never read ANY book in any sport I have played that converts so well to practical application.  GREAT WORK!!!!!!!   Thanks again!!!!
John

Flight School introduction and description

Flight School

 

It’s my hope that everyone maximizes their enjoyment of darts and progresses as far along the path as they wish to go from League Dart Player to international Dart Shooter.

 

If you have been at the game a while but find it difficult to move up to the next level of play – this is the program you want. Over come stagnation of your game with FS.

 

If you are new to the game and wish to learn the ins and outs- this is the program you want.

 

Flight School is an on-line (email) tutorial.

FS is useful to Dart Players (recreational level) and Dart Shooters (competitor level).

FS is much more than a couple of practice drills or ‘games’ to play.

FS is a program that allows a person to grow their game from the basics up to world class level if they wish.

 

Dart people receive help with organizing their efforts to become as good as can be, or wish to be. This help begins with identification of specific things which the person may wish to improve (action) and/or specific things about which they wish to know more (study/learn). 

Drills and Techniques, as well as personal suggestions for specific concerns, are supplied which are used to establish an effective practice regimen. This practice regimen has a proven track record with over three hundred current members and is all a person needs through out their dart life. (check out Ramblings & Ah Hah Moments)

 

Those who purchase my book “DARTS Beginning to End” will find Chapter 8.0 a chapter for do-it-yourself FS and may only need a bit of advice for organizing their practice regimen, which I will happily provide, as well as everything it takes to get the most out of the game/sport of darts.